Unotida Huye

Unotida Huye

Unotida Huye joined Young Africa as a franchisee in 2011. Her business had a very rocky start. She was not able to attract internal or external customers. This was because she was used to relying on church peers for business when she operated from her home.

Young Africa assisted Unotida’s business by purchasing more equipment for the catering department and guaranteeing her catering business from anyone who used Young Africa for workshops and conferences. Young Africa also enrolled Unotida for Improve Your Business Training. After this training, Unotida’s business turned around and she started to be contracted for catering jobs outside Young Africa.

 With revenue from her clients she was able to contribute to the marketing of the course and student enrollment increased. Today, the catering department trains around 120 students per year.

Unotida enjoys training young people and says “I take pride in training young people because that is the stage they need help in shaping their future”. In the future she intends to participate fully in curriculum review to ensure that the students are adequately trained for the catering world.


Trish

Trish

Trish (22) graduated in a certificate in Cutting and Designing from Hatcliff outreach program. Before enrolling in the course, Trish was a housewife who relied on her husband’s salary for all her basic needs. Her dream was to work in a clothing factory. This had not materalsied because she had no training in the area. After graduating from the outreach programme, equipped with her certificate, she started to work part-time for her neighbour who had a small sewing business.  From her earnings she was able save money and managed to purchase a sewing machine to start her business.

Young Africa Zimbabwe recommended her for a loan from their micro finance partner Virl Microfinance. Her application was successful and she received USD$300 which assisted her to purchase 2 more sewing machines. The business immediately grew and her average monthly net profit is USD$300. She is now financially independent.

Trish attributes this independence to the integration of vocational skills, life skills, entrepreneurship training, mentorships and post-training support.

Faith Mudandirini

Life for Faith Mudandirini (30) came to a standstill when her husband was retrenched from work in 2013.  Her husband had been the breadwinner in her family as she was not economically active. She did not have any skills which she could use to either be employed or to become an entrepreneur.

Faith heard about Young Africa courses from a friend and she quickly registered for the catering course at the Young Africa Skills Centre, Chitungwiza. After completing her training at Chitungwiza she was placed on attachment at Kebab Mater, a restaurant in Harare, for four months.

Initially, adjusting to the demands of a work place were challenging for her. However, with the support of her supervisor she flourished. Faith was very determined and by the end of the attachment period she was offered a full-time job. Faith is now earning $250 per month. Faith attributes the change in her life to Young Africa’s integrated vocational training. She said: ‘I had a negative attitude towards working and l did not have any goals in my life. Through life skills lessons I managed to change my attitude towards work and life in general. The training enabled me to be a more focused person in life and l started to set personal goals.”   

Christine Mhasvi

Christine Mhasvi

Christine Mhasvi (25) graduated, despite being a high school dropout, with a certificate in Hairdressing from Young Africa in December 2015. Her passion to start her own business was ignited when she was gaining industrial experience through a Small-Medium Enterprise Mentorship for 6 months. Immediately after graduation using her own savings she started her own income generating project by renting a chair in a hair salon. Her average income form the business was USD$350 per month. As time progressed she identified another opportunity related to her business. She noticed that clients who wanted to have a weave as part of the new hairstyle had to leave the salon to go and purchase elsewhere and at times would not return back to the hair salon. She managed to attend the Improve Your Business (IYB) training offered by Young Africa to see how she could operationalize the idea she had. During the training Virl Microfinance came to speak to them as business people about their products. She applied for a loan of USD$400 and was successful. Since she started the shop that sells weaves her average income is USD$800 per month.

Gift Mukonho

Gift Mukonho

Gift Mukonho (29) grew up as an orphan under the custody of his maternal grandmother in the rural community of Chiendambuya. Growing up in this rural area became even harder after he had to drop out of school and start herding cows to earn a living for his grandmother and cousins. In 2009 his grandmother passed away and his uncles who took over his deceased grandmother’s homestead chased him away.
Gift relocated to Rusape (Makoni District) where he lived on the streets before being taken in by a sympathising family who lived with him as their own son. In March 2016, Gift heard about vocational skills training being offered by Young Africa with the support of European Union and he went to enquire. He was surprised to find out that having 4 years of secondary school education was not a requirement. Immediately, he selected catering which he said he enjoyed learning so much about cooking.
As part of the training Gift was required to attend 2 months industrial attachment. Equipped with life skills he had learnt he approached a local restaurant PanMart who were impressed with what he had learnt. After 1 month they were so mesmerized with his hard-work and innovative business ideas that they offered him full time employment. In his graduation testimony Gift said with teary eyes, “in my life l had never dreamt of wearing an ironed shirt and a polished pair of shoes. Young Africa and EU have transformed my life and everyone who knew me in this town is surprised at my transformation. I even have my own place to live’’.

Miriam Chinyani

Miriam Chinyani

''I never thought I could be someone in life, I thank Young Africa for empowering me and bringing the best out of me'' says Miriam Chinyani (22years old). Miriam Chinyani is one of the many young people whose lives were changed through the holistic empowerment at Young Africa.

Miriam was just like any other girl when in 2011 after she passed only 2 subjects at Ordinary Level and could not proceed to higher education or secure employment. Being the first born in a family of 3, headed by her single mother who was struggling to put food on the table, Miriam had no option than to start buying and selling (cross border) clothing items. Life became a bitter pill to swallow for her as nothing materialised from her small business and she thought she could never make it in life. With the support of her struggling and caring mother she decided to enrol and train for catering in August 2015 at YA Chitungwiza after receiving advice from a YA past student.

Miriam is now employed with Spar Mvuma and earning a decent salary after completing part of her attachment with them. Miriam was quick to attribute her full time recruitment at Spar to good behaviour which was to a larger extent influenced by Life skills training, a component embedded in YA vocational training. Miriam claims she is now an independent empowered young girl who is now acquiring assets in her own name and is now helping her mother to take care of the family and her siblings who are at school.


Bridget Mujikijira

Bridget Mujikijira

Bridget Mujikijira graduated from YA Chitungwiza (Zimbabwe) in 2013 in Hairdressing & Cosmetology. Today she runs a cross border business in hairdressing between Cape Town and Chitungwiza. Bridget was a housewife before joining Young Africa. Her husband works as a truck driver with a fluctuating income. Since completing her course in August 2013, Bridget was able to use her hairdressing skills to earn an income by renting a chair at Makoni Shopping Centre. She is currently taking locally made hair pieces to cater for the Zimbabwean clientele in Cape Town. She is also able to contribute towards school fees for her child who is now in boarding school. Bridget says, “Young Africa not only teach us skills of the hand, but also focus on business skills. These business skills have helped me improve my (economic) situation.” She would like to raise the capital for buying equipment for her own hair salon in Harare.

Tafadzwa Chibaringa

Tafadzwa Chibaringa

Tafadzwa Chibaringa completed a course in Motor Vehicle Mechanics and graduated from YA Chitungwiza (Zimbabwe) in 2010. He joined the Aviation Ground Services as an Assistant Mechanic in 2013. He believes that YA has equipped him with technical skills to meet his needs and the life skills needed to be a responsible man. He would like to own his own garage and be an inspiration to other young people.


Tafadzwa Kunaka

Tafadzwa Kunaka

Tafadzwa Kunaka (22) graduated from Young Africa Zimbabwe in June 2012 with after completing a one year course in Panel Beating. He chose to do a course in Panel Beating while studying motor mechanics in Harare because he felt a greater interest in the craft of panel beating. He plans for a Panel Beating business with his friends. Tafadzwa says, “After studying at Young Africa I have gained an interest in business studies. Apart from the studying and skills of the hand, we also gained life skills. This has been very good for me. I have realised the value of working hard to be successful.” He also spends his time sharing this message in his community and encouraging young people to work hard in life.

Kudakwashe and Celestino

Kudakwashe and Celestino

They are both self-employed carpenters who run their business from Warren Park outside Harare. They both enrolled at Young Africa Zimbabwe in January 2008. At that time, they were being taken care of by a member of their family as they were both struggling financially. Initially, Kudakwashe wanted to become a mechanic, but on seeing the carpentry workshop he changed his mind and after discussing his options with his uncle, he decided carpentry was a better option as it created a better chance of making an income. Young Africa had played a huge part in the development of a skill which is now their main source of income for them and their families. They show us an impressive portfolio of the work they had completed since starting their business. There was an impressive array of cabinets, doors, wardrobes and bed frames, which was made all the more impressive by the fact that these are all made with hand tools and not machines.

Life skills and entrepreneurial classes had greatly affected their lives. They helped them to make better decisions in their everyday lives as well as in their working lives. Customer care is a crossover between both of these. They learned how to communicate in a more effective manner through life skills while they learned how to be better negotiators through entrepreneurial studies, which has had a massive impact on the success of their business. In the future, they’d love to have their own workshop and warehouse, so that they could make their own products without having to wait for orders with larger machines to help them be more efficient. You can feel the empathy that they have for the youth, as they have had the experience and understand how difficult it is for young people. They both agreed that they would love to have the resources and workload to employ young people and to give them opportunities to be resourceful and create income for their own families.

Contact us



Young Africa Zimbabwe
PO Box SK 150
Seke, Chitungwiza 
Zimbabwe
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 
 

Young Africa International - The Netherlands
Deventerstraat 130m
7321 CD
Apeldoorn
The Netherlands
+316 822 40 226
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
NL 03 ABNA 0466 782063
ANBI registration: 8068.23.598

 
 
Subscribe to our newsletter